Maisie Dobbs

Maisie Dobbs, by Jacqueline Winspear

If you grew up reading Nancy Drew you will love Maisie Dobbs. Winspear did a great job writing a very informative and compelling story. I always love to hear the little details of life that took place during major world events like World War One.  Maisie was raised as a housemaid but from a very young age had much more ambitious aspirations. With the help of a very kind and loving employer Maisie is given the opportunity to attend the university, only to have her studies interrupted with the onset of the war. As England attempts to get back on its feet Maisie sets up her own business as a private investigator (a great accomplishment for a woman of the time), the journey she takes while solving her first case is mysterious and creative. I couldn’t wait, and couldn’t predict, what was coming next!

*I rate my books in 5 categories on a scale from 1-5 with 5 being the highest.
Historical Value- 3
Emotional Value- 4
Entertainment Value- 4
Personal Character Value- 5
Age recommendation- 16+

“Truth walks toward us on the paths of our questions...as soon as you think you have the answer, you have closed the path and may miss vital new information. Wait awhile in the stillness, and do not rush to conclusions, no matter how uncomfortable the unknowing.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“Shame, isn’t it? That we only like our heroes out in the street when they are looking their best and their uniforms are ‘spit and polished,’ and not when they’re showing us the wounds they suffered on our behalf.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“Memories are links in a golden chain that bind us until we meet again.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“The extraordinary hides behind the camouflage of the ordinary. Assume nothing, Maisie.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“There is nothing of which every man is so afraid, as getting to know how enormously much he is capable of doing and becoming.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“Thus a day that had seen so many tears ended in the midst of a rainbow.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“The boy laughed, for he was a boy and not yet a man.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“Though there had yet to be a victor in this great war that had begun almost three years ago, Maurice had written to her that they had, all of them, on all sides, lost their freedom. Freedom to think hopefully of the future.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
“As soon as you think you have the answer, you have closed the path and may miss vital new information. Wait awhile in the stillness, and do not rush to conclusions, no matter how uncomfortable the unknowing.” ― Jacqueline Winspear
 
 
Categories: 

Comments

Add new comment

Reader Comments